The Sarah Daft Home
 
 
 
 
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Resident Life

Our doors are always open - we're family

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Everything we do here at the Sarah Daft Home, we do with a sense of togetherness. We come together for meals, activities, and friendship. The community of staff and residents at Sarah Daft work together to provide a wonderful environment where residents will thrive, not decline. Everyone works together to give one another a role and a purpose.

Because we're a small home, with a small staff, we're able to operate in ways that are more human; less corporate. We believe that we have the best staff because each human who works here is motivated by compassion, not money.

"We're not just doing their care – we’re their friend, social worker, care coordinator, their neighbor. That's a big deal. It's important work."

Our small building and tight-knit community allows for premier attention and care for each resident. One staff member even purchased new clothes for a resident - with her own money. The resident's new outfit was the exact impetus needed to draw her out of her room, so she could "show off". 

Sarah Daft Leadership →

 


Creating a culture of whole health

Mental health improves when given purpose. We find many residents go from being room-bound and quiet to active and social when given an opportunity to contribute. 

Residents are invited to "share" in the household duties, such as:

  • Arranging the flowers, delivered weekly
  • Setting the tables
  • Folding towels
  • Gardening
  • Passing out mail

Residents also take great pride in contributing to the community, through shared activities, events and charities, such as:

  • Creating new resident kits for area homeless
  • Weekly music time with University of Utah students
  • Easter egg hunt with the local Baptist church
  • Promoting reading through story time with area children

My sister lived at Sarah Daft for five years. Staff members became her extended family. I had absolute trust that she would receive the best possible care—and she did.
— Grehte B. Peterson